Cinema Day: The Curious Case of Cinematic Brows

Cinema Day: The Curious Case of Cinematic Brows

Cinema has forever been a celebration of humanity. It is a debate: whether mankind inspires cinema or the cinema is a directive for how people live their lives. Since the early realms, it does reflect the systems of society. The first motion picture Roundhay Garden Scene filmed the leisure of the elites at Oakwood Grange but never really focused on the workings of their expression in 1888 though this didn’t last more than a decade.

 The 1900s was an onset of cinema that rolled in silence but spoke with expressions. The silent film era was all about what you could possibly convey to the world without a word. The makers then didn’t have the luxury of voice, so brows were an essential part of what was conveyed to the onlooker. 

The highlighted and denser brows reign in the early 1900s until the color palette grew diverse and the voice was an added fuel to the cinema. As the colors grew brighter, the eyebrows were less focused on though, before this stage, Charlie Chaplin surely set the base of magnificent expressions and moving brows. The surprise, the happiness, the crying, the grief, every expression was expressed by the brows. It is how films like Dr. Jekyll & Hyde (1912), Cleopatra (1912), When Paris Loves (1913), Making A Living (1914), or the significant performance of Chaplin in Shoulder Arms (1918), held a world of brows which worked wonders to express everything they really wanted to say. Though this wasn’t the set course of brows in cinema. 

In recent years, eyebrow-less-ness is a trending concept that survives in worldwide cinema. The two-time Oscar-awardee Christopher Waltz sported a no - eyebrow henna look in The Zero Theorem (2012), it only added a lot more work to his character of a hairless computer genius. We are reminded of other actors who have demonstrated that they didn't require those above-the-eye hair clumps to convey their emotions to audiences by Waltz's decision to go the methodical route and shave his eyebrows. 

Jared Leto chose to travel down this for Dallas Buyers Club and Suicide Squad turning to another one in line for the Oscar, though I wonder if this is the key?

*winks* 

Eventually, he did consider it to be his identity and expressed so on the Ellen DeGeneres Show, “It’s going to be strange to make a film with eyebrows and without lipstick. I’m going to feel kind of naked.” Shaping one’s eyebrow in a particular frame often leads to us getting used to it. This look was further sported by Rooney Mara, Bel Geldof, Keanu Reeves, Jason Giggs, and a lot more international artists across the world. This is why choosing a semi-permeable element to make them look thicker, bleak, or otherwise is the right way down the lane.

The current running trend of bleached brows has celebrities like Kristen Stewart of Twilight fame, Kendall Jenner, Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, Julia Fox, and a lot more with their blonde ambition though, this does come with a drawback of using chemicals near one’s eyes that makes the eyebrow hair turn dry and brittle. It also doesn’t last longer than a weak and begins to show roots thereafter giving an uncanny look to the brows. 

Yet, there’s a simple solution. 

 The high-bliss of Hollywood took a route to eyebrow tattoos served via henna brows that last up to six weeks and are natural in their making. With the H-town bling of Angelina Jolie, Rihanna, Katie Price, Natalie Cassidy, and Coleen Rooney sporting the tattoo-like effect of henna brows, this is surely what comes next and makes it big on the cinema banner. 

Mina Ibrow Henna serves as a natural alternative to brow tinting and is a leading manufacturer in the brow henna market. While the sparse brows have a pretty party with this henna for eyebrows, it surely leaves a remarkable effect on the brows. It is available in 12 shades and is purely structured to be the perfect answer for a denser, thicker and boss-like look to your brows. 

 

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